I’ve been contemplating this. Please read fully before attacking me.
I’ve noticed a lot of statements regarding people being to easily “offended” by things. That may be true, but that statement is being used to dismiss actual dialogue in many situations. It’s ok to be offended by certain things, and to bring it up in a rational way. That’s how conversations are started, and how people learn to understand. It’s also ok to say “that comes across as a bit racist” or “That can be mistakenly viewed as a racist statement.”
Those words are meant to bring light to a situation. It’s ok to ask “How so?” and it’s ok to discuss it. For my White friends, I know you are all good people. Most of you are not “racists” but some of you may be ignorant of certain things. You have some prejudices, so do I. It’s something I work to get over and to improve on constantly. Please don’t get “offended” by the statement, but seek dialogue.
Here are some situations, and my views on them. These views apply to some people, and not to others.

1. I have heard the statement “They are taking our jobs” from people in regards to immigrants. Let’s analyze that. Many of the people being accused of this are migrant workers, earning less than minimum wage. We currently have an unemployment rate of about 5.5 to 6%. If migrant workers are “taking” these jobs, it’s because those 19 million Americans are either A. unqualified,C. unwilling to do those jobs, or C. Being passed over because those hiring are trying to circumvent labor laws. The solutions would be to put more money to education and the enforcement of labor laws. Hold companies accountable for hiring undocumented people instead of demonizing those coming over and looking for an opportunity.

2. I’ve seen people offended that minorities bring up stories of injustices to them. Statements are made like “I would never do that” or “I’ve never seen that happen”. Congrats, we aren’t talking about you, and you live in a wonderful area where people aren’t outwardly racist. This doesn’t mean that it doesn’t happen in other places, or when you aren’t around. Listen, think. How would you feel if you walked into a mall and were followed around all day by a Police officer? This happened to me, I was in slacks and a button up shirt, and I was shopping, and paying for stuff. He profiled me because I “don’t fit in”. That was wrong, on his part. I didn’t do anything stupid, I kept calm and I was annoyed and offended.

3. Asking for bad police officers to be held accountable for breaking the law, or abusing their power, doesn’t mean people don’t support law enforcement. Most police officers are hard working, good people. Just like most people of any ethnic, religious, or political group tend to be good people. Holding bad people accountable for their actions is part of making sure everyone has justice.

4. Being Pro-Choice doesn’t mean being pro-abortion. It means that I let women, and their doctors, make their own medical decisions. I have my personal views, I keep them to myself. There are medical reasons, and ethical reasons, for abortion. Every situation is different.

5. Don’t cheer the death of anyone. The loss of any life is tragic. It doesn’t matter what they looked like, or what they did, we should learn to treat each other with respect. The taking of any life is a serious thing, and something that shouldn’t be done callously.

6. Corporations aren’t people, but since they are being treated that way, they should pay their fair share of taxes. If they choose to offshore their headquarters, in an attempt to bypass tax laws, then they should have tariffs levied against them. If they want to contribute to the political process, then they need to pay up like the rest of us. Same for Churches.

Stop demonizing groups of people. Realize that assholes exist in all groups. Listen to each other. Put yourself in someone else’s shoes.

You are welcome to disagree with me. I encourage it. Keep it civil though, let’s have discussions. I will delete any post that attacks me, or someone else. We need to talk TO each other, not AT each other.


When I was in Elementary school, I went to a school that didn’t have many Asians in it. I remember being in 2nd grade and having some kid say something about his uncle fighting the Vietnamese in Vietnam. He made fun of me because I had to be one of them. I’m not Vietnamese, but to that kid, and his parents, all Asians had to be Vietnamese and were not “welcome”. As I grew older I learned about the Japanese internment camps, and how Japanese Americans were distrusted, just because of their heritage. I asked why German and Italian Americans weren’t placed in camps too. I learned that many were discriminated upon, but mostly they could blend in and assimilate.
I saw racism focus on anyone that looked “Arabic” during the first Gulf war, and then after 9-11. Even Indian friends faced racism because bigoted Americans couldn’t tell the difference. I know Koreans faced the same kinds of Racism during the Korean War, and the Chinese were mistreated during the 1800’s because of the influx of immigrants. I now see Latinos being targeted for the same reasons.
All these groups face racism for one reason. They don’t “look” American. I’ve been the victim of such racism. I often times talk about Americans as if I wasn’t one. I was born here, I’ve only ever lived in the U.S. I’ve been called out for talking about Americans because I am one so why don’t I always claim it? I now realize I meant “white” people when I talked about “Americans”. That’s wrong, I’m an American I’m proud to be one. I claim it proudly, and I hold no ill will. I love this country.
I grew up feeling like I didn’t belong because I didn’t “look” right. That feeling is something that evolved from the casual racism that young children are exposed to. It’s something we must all stop from happening.
Let’s all take a moment to realize that most of us are descended from immigrants. We all have ancestors that probably fought each other. We are all here for the same reasons. The promise of opportunity. Stop pointing out differences and start looking at each other’s humanity. No child should grow up feeling like an outcast in a nation of immigrants.

Full Friday

Joseph cautiously peeked over his cube wall. The SAP migration to Linux was well on its way. Terminal junkies were in their T-shirts and jeans, greedily consuming endless amounts of coffee. Random issues with ancillary systems kept Joseph from sneaking out at 1. His head pounded from the stress of having to work a full Friday. The needed SPN changes hung over his head, forcing him to commit to staying another half hour.
Bitterly he took a drink of his water, cursing the PMs involved.
“Next Friday I shall skip out early” he vowed.

Daily updates

Joseph slumped in his desk chair. The hard plastic headset was pinching his ears. The monotone voice of his coworker blasted through, lulling him to a state of drowsiness.
He was half-halfheartedly paying attention to the discussion. The daily updates were the same ever day, the project was on task to catastrophically fail. As his head nodded up and down he kept willing his eyes to stay open. Nobody was interested in listening to different ideas. His task was to sit on the line and explain how easy his part would be completed and to prevent himself from pointing out the other obvious flaws in the plan.


Time to get up, time to get ready.

No time to think, go, go, go!

Don’t slow down, keep on going.

Life won’t slow down.

The feeling of despair lingers,

Like the last bit of morning fog.

Every moment tainted by haze.

Overwhelming burden, waiting to crash down.

The yearning to be complete always pushed back.

No time to wonder, or regret.

No time to focus on dreams or desires.

Guilt and responsibility fill the void.